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Expand/Collapse Category : Copyright Information ‎(8)

Expand/Collapse Title : "Fair Usage" ‎(1)

The "fair use" of copyrighted materials refers to the reproduction or copying of copyrighted materials without receiving authorized permission to do so when that reproduction or copying can be shown to meet a "Four-Factor Fair Use Test":

Here are the four "fair use factors":

  1. What is the character of the use?

  2. What is the nature of the work to be used?

  3. How much of the work will you use?

  4. What effect would this use have on the market for the original or for permissions if the use were widespread?

The nature of the response to any one of these four factors can influence the weight given to one or more of the other three in determining what constitutes the "fair use" of a work in a given circumstance or instance, making rulings of the courts in one case almost moot in determining the outcome of infringement suits filed in other cases. The recent reversal in the Texaco suit is a good case in point.

 

The bottom line is that any unauthorized reproduction of copyrighted materials--even in an academic setting--brings an individual instructor and his/her institution into an arena of high risk!

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Background ‎(1)

Both the increased availability of materials for instruction and the enhancement of learning and the skyrocketing costs of the same create dilemmas, from time to time, for instructors who want to enrich their teaching and the experiences of their students.

 

When that means copying, transcribing electronically, photocopying, reprinting, or even republishing copyrighted materials, instructors and their agents risk both personal and institutional liabilities with fines as high as $100,000 per incident of copyright infringement. Such an infringement could be as little as the unauthorized reproduction of a single page!

 

At the same time, publishers have shown little reluctance in filing suit against violators, even within non-profit educational settings. In fact, to tighten restrictions even further in their interest in protecting their profits, many publishers and producers of copyrighted materials have created "Permissions Departments" which have extensive authority to dictate fees, define royalties, grant permissions, and even sell highly restrictive licenses for the use of their works.

 

The effect of "licensing" use of copyrighted materials openly challenges traditional claims to "fair usage," even in academic institutions engaged in both teaching and research.

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Expand/Collapse Title : Disclaimer ‎(1)

The issue of copyright in an academic setting and a set of operating guidelines for management of reproduction of copyrighted materials in our department. This discussion does not represent a legal opinion and is not meant to substitute for legal consultation on any specific case.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Guidelines for Mountain View College ‎(1)

  1. Copyrighted materials reproduced without permission should conform to the "Rules of Thumb" referenced above.

  2. Copyrighted materials reproduced with permission must clearly state as much, identifying the authorizing agency and date of copyright (usually the date/year of publication).

  3. Requests for reproduction of materials which meet these guidelines will be facilitated by support staff in a timely manner.

  4. College support staff reserve the right to hold any requests which to them may be in violation of the guidelines. All such cases will be brought to the attention of the Chair who will consult with the instructor. The Chair will approve or deny the request for reproduction. The instructor may appeal the decision of the Chair to the Executive Dean for Arts and Sciences or seek written permission for reproduction from the appropriate authority.

  5. Requests for permission should be specific and should completely detail what is to be reproduced and how, when and how it is to be displayed or distributed and in what quantities, and the period of time in which the permission is to be authorized.

  6. Instructors should keep all copies of written permissions to reproduce copyrighted materials.

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Expand/Collapse Title : Implications ‎(1)

Does this mean that instructors cannot reproduce and distribute copyrighted materials of any kind?

 

Answer: No, not necessarily so, depending on the "four factor" use test above, but an instructor's interpretation is open to contest in court should a publisher choose to file suit, and courts have been ambivalent in their interpretations.

 

Generally, teachers are free to reproduce and distribute copyrighted materials that meet the "four-factor test" in a face-to-face classroom display of that material. That does not apply to the reproduction and distribution of the same materials a second time in another class, in another course, or in a subsequent semester.

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Expand/Collapse Title : Links to Sites Addressing Copyright Law and Academic Policies ‎(1)

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Expand/Collapse Title : Purpose ‎(1)

The purpose of this site is twofold:

  • to provide staff development on the subject of the academic use and distribution of materials protected under the statutes of copyright laws, and

  • to identify specific guidelines governing academic use and distribution of such materials for the faculty of Mountain View College.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : UT "Rules of Thumb" ‎(1)

Some Guidelines

The University of Texas has adopted a clear set of guidelines called "Rules of Thumb" that have been announced as operating policies. These "Rules of Thumb" seem most reasonable, given the unstable legal setting education faces presently. It should be noted, however, that any particular case for "fair use" reproduction may fail under court scrutiny depending on the interpretations defined under the "Four-Factor Fair Use Test." In other words, the reproduction of a single chapter from a book might still violate infringement even though the short amount of text might seem otherwise to qualify a selection under "fair use."

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM


Expand/Collapse Category : Evaluating and Selecting Online Sources ‎(10)

Expand/Collapse Title : "Bookmarking" Your Better Sites ‎(1)

Be sure to save your links to important sites you discover by "bookmarking" them. (Some web service providers use different terminology. America Online, for example, gives you the option of adding to your "favorite sites.") If you have doubts about how to do that, consult the online "Help" menu for your browser or homepage for your service provider.

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Expand/Collapse Title : About Search Engines ‎(1)

"Search engines" are web programs that search the World Wide Web for webpages and websites. While you are probably familiar with two or three of the more popular search engines, it would be a good investment of an hour or more to explore others. In fact, it might be surprising to you to know that there are several hundred available to you. Here's a link to Beaucoup! a list service to more than 1,800 search engines arranged in various categories!

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Assessing Internet Resources ‎(1)

By the end of 1997 there were some 4 million documents estimated on the World Wide Web, not to mention the other resources--Telnet, Gopher and FTP sites. At the turn of the century, there are close to a billion. The organic Internet, sprouting hundreds of new sites by the hour, is the best example of the principle of free speech in action. It is a truly global arena through which people around the world have instant access to one another, who, with only a double click, splinter the barriers of business, politics, religion, economics, philosophy, and geography. Literally anyone with access to a browser can surf a virtual universe of information, and anyone with a service provider can design and upload a personal website.

Needless-to-say, on the Internet you will find information on every conceivable topic. The problem is not so much how to get to the information, however, but rather, how to evaluate it. While most worthy information is likely to be found online for just about every subject, there is also a plethora of most unworthy information as well.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Juried Sources ‎(1)

Occasionally, you will find sites which identify editorial or advisory boards. This means that information contained has usually been reviewed by a team of people or outside judges, often by those same people whose names appear as board members, advisors, or jurists (editors). Their task has been to review and evaluate all submissions from individual scholars. They have selected only the better submissions for posting on the website. These sources provide very valuable information.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Online Scholarly Publications ‎(1)

Many professional and research associations maintain websites which also include links to their journals published online. Often, the online journals contain the same articles as their hardcopy publications which you can find in the stacks of your college or university library. If you don't know the names of some of the professional associations, ask your librarian for assistance. Libraries have lists of journals to which they subscribe which you can browse for possible titles.

Type in the name of a journal (like the Harvard Educational Review)or the field or discipline (like "health" or "physics") in the online search engine. Often, the title of the online publication will be posted very close to the top of the listings. If you have entered a key word instead of a specific title, the first few options which your browser reveals will give you clearer ideas about how to refine your search. One valuable clue to the value of the source is the online description accompanying the title of the website. The descriptions will often identify the origin and purpose of the site.

When you find a worthy source (from the accompanying description or address extension), you often will be given a hypertext (active link) option to search for "more topics like this one," or something to that effect. By clicking on this link, you will be able to narrow your search.

 

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Expand/Collapse Title : Publishers' Sites ‎(1)

Most publishers of academic textbooks have developed websites to promote both their books and accompanying online websites supporting one or even a set of texts. While some sites provide only "teasers" (tantalizing bits and pieces) as introductions to spark the interest of a surfing professor reviewing texts, other publishers' sites offer open links to many help web documents like style pages, grammar checks, as well as content pages of selected topics.

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Expand/Collapse Title : Selecting Online Sources  - Organizational Sites (www. . . .org) ‎(1)

Many professional, non-profit, and social organizations have websites on which they post the latest information relative to their interests and expertise. They will often link to other sites which contain information which they support or acknowledge as significant. Look for the extension of ".org" in their addresses.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Selecting Online Sources - Academic Sites (www. . . .edu) ‎(1)

Look for sites which contain the closing extension ".edu" at the end of the URL (online address). While many colleges and universities also post FTP sites (which lack the distinguishing extension ".edu"), almost all have educational addresses as well. Because the college and university sites tend to post academic information developed by both experienced teaching professors as well as researchers on their staff, educational sites generally post very reliable and valuable information. You might want to visit The World Lecture Hall for links to online course information around the world.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Selecting Online Sources - Government Sites (www. . . .gov) ‎(1)

Many local, state, and national government agencies also maintain websites. You can find timely, valuable statistical and other information on these sites about thousands of topics. Type in the name of the city, county, state, or country in the search engine of your browser. You'll be greeted with a menu of categories of information to choose from. Government online addresses will contain a ".gov" extension.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Some Warnings ‎(1)

The types of websites described above are usually reliable sources of information. Even reviewing these, however, you should always remain cautious. For those sites not identified above, generally be wary of web documents that

  • make claims without documenting corroborating information and recognized authorities;

  • reflect lack of proofreading and editing;

  • offer unsolicited advice;

  • contain incoherent descriptions with their browser listings;

  • accompany solicitations of products and services;

  • charge fees for entry into the website;

  • are not current;

  • contain unmaintained documents or information; or

  • solicit credit card or other personal information.

It is next to impossible to evaluate the credibility of every site you download , but the guidelines contained here should help you in your initial review of online resources.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM


Expand/Collapse Category : Faculty Resources ‎(18)

Expand/Collapse Title : Faculty Resources ‎(1)

This document is an online resource library for staff of the Mountain View College Department of English. Its purpose is to provide professional materials and shareware created by various members of the department to enhance student learning. Faculty interested in posting materials on this site should email Geoffrey Grimes who will help facilitate and upload the items.

Copyright Information

Syllabus Development

Online Literature Libraries and Other Online Library Resources

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Format for a Syllabus ‎(1)

The syllabus you prepare for your classes should reflect the following outline. Each syllabus will be posted within the first two weeks on the English Department Website and a printed copy in the Department Office. These postings will be helpful to students who need to clarify information about their courses or to explore requirements for future courses in their schedules.

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Expand/Collapse Title : Instructions for Filing in the Department Office ‎(1)

  1. Select a disk in the Office of the English Department Assistant which has been pre-formatted for both Microsoft Word and WordPerfect 6.1/2.

  2. Complete your syllabus on the disk or copy it from your hard drive onto the disk. Then return the disk to the Department Assistant, preferably during the first week of the semester.

  3. Print out one copy of each syllabus and turn it in to the Department Assistant. She will post them in the binder in the Department Office.

  4. Please use the headings below for each division.

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Learning Outcomes for English Courses ‎(12)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to

Increasing Writing Skills

  1. recognize that writing is a process involving generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. use these elements of the writing process appropriately.

  2. set appropriate priorities at each point in the writing process.

  3. adapt your writing process to different time constraints, such as a class period, several weeks, or a semester.

  4. write for a variety of audiences, not just your instructor.

  5. adapt your language, sentence structure, and organization to fit the audience, purpose, and topic of the writing task.

  6. write for a variety of purposes.

  7. focus on a central idea that controls and unifies the whole piece of writing.

  8. support your ideas with details (illustrations, examples, descriptions) that will make them clear to your readers.

  9. demonstrate a sense of personal voice in your own writing and the ability to vary it accordingly.

  10. produce effective and mature papers of several paragraphs.

Increasing Reading Skills

  1. identify the main ideas and supporting details in a variety of reading selections, ranging from student to professional works.

  2. analyze how the work of student and professional writers achieves the writer's purpose.

  3. produce writing based upon your synthesis of written material with your own knowledge and opinions.

Introducing Research Skills

  1. locate and evaluate sources for writing tasks.

  2. demonstrate preliminary research skills: summarize, paraphrase, synthesize, and document information.

Building Analytical Thinking Skills

  1. demonstrate maturity of thought by analyzing, questioning, and reflecting on ideas.
  2. understand the relationship between oral and written communication.

Improving Attitudes towards Communications Skills

  1. develop confidence in yourself as a writer.

  2. understand the value of writing in your life as a way to learn, record, communicate, and understand.

  3. have more awareness of your own writing process.

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Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to

 

Refining Writing Skills

  1.  continue to use the processes of writing including inventing, drafting, revising, and editing.
  2. write paragraphs or essays suitable for a specific audience or purpose.
  3. support a position logically in your writing.
  4. respond in writing to meanings and values encountered in readings using analysis and synthesis.
  5. write argument and/or persuasion that supports a position.
  6. write a formal research paper that incorporates various resources (such as books, interviews, articles, TV programs, dictionaries) and adheres to appropriate standards of format and documentation.

Refining Reading Skills

  1. read a variety of writings (ranging from student to professional works).

  2. recognize the author's purpose and follow the author's line of argument and formulate generalizations about key concepts in readings.

  3. recognize patterns in readings, such as comparison/contrast, cause and effect.

  4. identify rhetorical and/or literary devices.

  5. differentiate between primary and secondary resource materials.

Refining Research Skills

  1. use the various services of a college or public library.
  2. find and use a variety of sources to support your purpose in both expository and persuasive writing.
  3. paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information from sources.

Building Critical Thinking Skills

  1. identify problems and propose and evaluate ways to solve them.
  2. recognize and use inductive and deductive reasoning.
  3. recognize fallacies in reasoning.
  4. draw defensible conclusions from information found in various sources.
  5. comprehend, develop, and use concepts and generalizations.
  6. distinguish between fact, inference, and opinion.

Improving Attitudes Towards Communications Skills

  1. write with increased confidence.

  2. understand the value of writing in your life as a way to learn, record, communicate, and understand.

  3. be aware that effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening are essential humanizing skills in our culture.

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English 2307: Creative Writing

 

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be more familiar and comfortable with the creative writing process.

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English 2311: Technical Writing

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to

  1. apply the principles of technical style to writing projects in a technical arena.

  2. draft, edit, and revise technical compositions.

  3. use computer software applications appropriate for the development of technical writing.

  4. compose graphics for technical compositions.

  5. read and understand a college textbook explaining principles of technical writing.

  6. evaluate student compositions.

  7. develop and organize a manual of assignments.

  8. write short, informal technical communications.

  9. write informal reports.

  10. write longer informal and semi-formal reports.

  11. write resumes and other job-related correspondence.

  12. write a user's or some other type of technical manual.

  13. identify on-line technical writing resources on the internet.

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English 2322: Early British Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to

  1. increase their appreciation of the English language.

  2. learn to identify kinds of sonnets (English and Italian).

  3. understand the idea of the Renaissance and of Humanism.

  4. demonstrate writing skills.

  5. identify relevant (and gorgeous) quotations from Shakespeare and other poets.

  6. analyze love and hate through Shakespeare's tragedies.

  7. discover that learning can be incredibly stimulating.

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English 2323: Modern British Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to

 

  1. demonstrate a working vocabulary of terms necessary to the understanding of literature.

  2. demonstrate critical thinking skills as applied to the analysis of literature.

  3. better understand and appreciate literature in general and English literature specifically.

  4. analyze and discuss the interrelationship of history, politics, philosophy, and literature—with emphasis on the English scene.

  5. better able to read for pleasure and knowledge.

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English 2327: Early American Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. build meaning by drawing inferences about literature from personal experience.

  2. appreciate literal meaning by understanding vocabulary, recognizing content, and paraphrasing.

  3. recognize implied concepts and motifs in literature.

  4. discuss orally and in writing distinctive American themes and values addressed in the literature and in the lectures.

  5. identify authors and their works addressed in the class.

  6. apply critical thinking and literary terminology appropriately when analyzing selections of literature.

  7. demonstrate patterns of writing appropriate to the analysis and evaluation of literature.

  8. explain relationships of literary concepts studied to personal and contemporary social experience.

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English 2328: Modern American Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. recognize the basic elements of fiction (plot, theme, character, symbol, style, and point of view) as they appear in selected works of American literature.

  2. recognize recurring themes as they appear in selected works of American literature.

  3. demonstrate their understanding of selected assignments by responding to evaluation that tests their ability to read closely (identify an important direct quotation from a short story, for example).

  4. understand the themes, philosophies, and symbolic comments portrayed in recent American literature.

  5. be more aware of literature as a product of their own culture, thereby gaining a better understanding of themselves and their immediate world.

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English 2332: Early World Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to

  1. have a working knowledge of Greek mythology and of representative masterpieces of world literature.

  2. demonstrate their knowledge of selected assignments.

  3. practice their English 1301 and 1302 skills (organization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling) in quizzes and through essays.

  4. build and have a past that connects us to each other.

  5. understand myth and how it has the power to open up a reality often obscured by historical "facts."

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English 2333: Modern World Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to

  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of selected literature from around the world according to traditional time periods, historical events, and major thematic and stylistic expressions.

  2. show proficiency as a writer on these selected readings, demonstrating, of course, college-level mastery of essay organization, grammatical function, punctuation, spelling, and word processing.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

English 2370: Studies in Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to

  1. discuss in writing and in class discussions major themes and motifs characteristic of the literature assignments.

  2. recognize both stated and implied meanings in literary selections that reflect the theme or period of study.

  3. identify authors and their literature.

  4. use literary terminology appropriately.

  5. write an analytical essay upon a literary topic.

  6. draw inferences from various literary motifs that help relate the literature to personal or social experience.

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English 2371: Studies in Literature

Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to

  1. explain elements of style that characterize a writer's works.

  2. write an analytical essay upon a literary topic.

  3. distinguish between genres of literature introduced in the course.

  4. discuss the distinctive cultural motifs which differentiate regional points of view expressed in literature or which contrast to students' own lifestyles.

  5. recognize both stated and implied meanings in literary selections that reflect an author's point of view.

  6. draw inferences from various literary motifs that help relate the literature to personal or social experience.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Official Course Descriptions ‎(1)

Official course descriptions can be found on the DCCCD website.

 

Course Descriptions for ENGL

 

Learning Outcomes for English Courses

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Online Literature Libraries and Other Online Library Resources ‎(1)

This document is an online resource library for staff of the Mountain View College Department of English. Its purpose is to provide professional materials and shareware to enhance student learning. Faculty interested in posting materials on this site should email Geoffrey Grimes who will help facilitate and upload the items.

Starting Point for Literary Research
http://www.kingsu.ab.ca/~angela/literary.html (link down)

Alex Catalog of Electronic Texts
http://www.infomotions.com/alex/

A Guide for Writing Research Papers Using the MLA Style Sheet
http://webster.commnet.edu

Guide to Grammar and Writing
http://webster.commnet.edu

Literary Resources on the Net
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Lit/

The Electronic Archives for Teaching the American Literature
http://www.georgetown.edu

Project Gutenberg
http://www.promo.net/pg/

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources
http://info.lib.uh.edu

Bibliomania
http://www.bibliomania.com/

Online Texts Collection
http://www.ipl.org/

Carrie: A Full-Text Electronic Library

http://www.cc.ukans.edu/carrie/archives_main.html (link down)

Hypertexts
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/hypertex.html

www.americanliterature.com
http://www.americanliterature.com/

The Online Books Page
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/

The Electronic Archives for Teaching the American Literatures
http://www.georgetown.edu

 

2/19/2008 9:04 AM

Expand/Collapse Title : Sample Syllabus ‎(1)

The Syllabus for English (course number): (section number)
Mountain View College
(Semester, Year)

Instructor Information

Instructor: (name), Professor of English
Office Number: (office number)
Office Hours: MWF (office hours) TR (office hours)
Telephone Number(s): (telephone numbers)
Fax Number: (area code) (number)
E-mail: (e-mail address)

I. Course Description (See the DCCCD English Course Descriptions for more information)

Course Prerequisites
English 1301:
Successful completion of THEA or MAPS (for new students) SAT scores of _____; ACT scores of ________ for returning students

English 1302:
Successful completion of English 1301 English 2xxx: Successful completion of English 1301 and 1302

(Note: Students with transcripts from colleges or universities which do not require this sequence may be exempted with Arts and Sciences/Department approval. For example, students attending Texas A&M are not required to complete English 1302 but, in several degree programs, are required to complete English 2311–Technical Writing. We have been routinely accommodating these students.)

II. Learning Outcomes: (see Learning Outcomes for more information.) At the end of this course, you will be able to 1) -------------------------------; 2) -------------------------------; and X) ------------------------------.

(Copies of the "Common Learning" outcomes for English 1301 and 1302 can be found on the disk under "Outcomes.")

III. Books/Materials
Textbook(s)
Required: (author), (title), edition
Textbook(s) Recommended: (author), (title), edition

IV. Units of Instruction
List each assignment or exercise the student is expected to complete toward course credit or grading during the semester.)

V. Evaluation

Grading Procedure:
Explain in detail how grades will be determined. If attendance is to be either a direct or indirect factor affecting grades, explain in detail.

Grade Scale: (Identify the numerical range for a grade of "A," "B," "C," "D," and "F.)

Example:
90 - 100 = A
80 - 89 = B
70 - 79 = C
60 - 69 = D
Below 59 = F


Honors Credit: (optional)
Explain how students may achieve honors credit. Note that students must complete all work for a grade of "A" before they are eligible for honors designation. For example, there is no such thing as "B - Honors."

VI. Attendance Policy from the MVC College Catalog
(You must include the college attendance policy reproduced below.)

Class Attendance:
Students are expected to attend regularly all classes in which they are enrolled. Students have the responsibility to attend class and to consult with the instructor when an absence occurs. Instructors are responsible for describing attendance policies and procedures to all students enrolled in their classes. If a student is unable to complete a course (or courses) in which he/she is registered, it is the student's responsibility to withdraw from the course by the appropriate date. (The date is published in the academic calendar each year and in each semester's class schedule.) If the student does not withdraw, he/she will receive a performance grade, usually a grade of "F." Students who are absent from class for the observance of a religious holiday may take an examination or complete an assignment scheduled for that day within a reasonable time after the absence if, not later than the 15th day of the semester, the student notified the instructor(s) that the student would be absent for a religious holiday. Sec. 51.911 Tx. Educ. Code.

Dropping A Course Or Withdrawing From College:
To drop a class or withdraw from the College, students must follow the prescribed procedure. It is the student's responsibility to drop or withdraw. Failure to do so will result in receiving a performance grade, usually a grade of "F." Should circumstances prevent a student from appearing in person to withdraw from the College, the student may withdraw by mail by writing the Registrar. A drop/withdrawal request by mail must be received in the Registrar's Office by the semester deadline. No drop or withdrawal requests are accepted by telephone. Students who drop a class or withdraw from the College before the semester deadline receive a "W" (Withdraw) in each class dropped. The deadline for receiving a "W" is indicated on the academic calendar and the current class schedule. See "Refund Policy" for possible refund eligibility.

STUDENTS WHO WITHDRAW FROM A MANDATED REMEDIATION COURSE AS A RESULT OF THEA PERFORMANCE MUST ALSO WITHDRAW FROM ALL COLLEGE-COURSES.

The deadline for withdrawal with a "W" this semester is --------------.
VII. Other Information

College Telephone Numbers (optional)

MVC Police (214) 860-8758
Department of English (214) 860-8624
Office of the President (214) 860-8700
Office of the Executive Dean of Arts & Sciences (214) 860-8736
Office of the Executive Dean of Work Force Development (214) 860-8656
Office of Continuing Education (214) 860-8612
Office of Enrollment Management/Registrar (214) 860-8600
Office of Public Information (214) 860-8680
Counseling (214) 860-8606 Student Programs and Resources (214) 860-8685

Instructions for Preparing Syllabi for Filing in the Department Office

  1. Select a disk in the Office of the English Department Assistant which has been pre-formatted for both Microsoft Word and WordPerfect 6.1/2.

  2. Complete your syllabus on the disk or copy it from your hard drive onto the disk. Then return the disk to the Department Assistant, preferably during the first week of the semester.

  3. Print out one copy of each syllabus and turn it in to the Department Assistant. She will post them in the binder in the Department Office.

  4. Please use the headings below for each division.

2/19/2008 9:04 AM


Expand/Collapse Category : Online Resources for Writers ‎(1)

Expand/Collapse Title : Online Resources for Writers ‎(1)

The following listings are to resources currently available on the Internet which college composition students will find helpful. Links within each source will guide you to many additional materials. However, if you are relatively new to using the Internet and World Wide Web, you may wish to begin your exploration with some suggestions for evaluating online sources.

 

Online Documentation Style Sheets

Online Writing Centers