Stress Relief

Stress is your physical, emotional and mental response to change, regardless of whether the change is good or bad. Without stress, people would not get much done. The extra burst of adrenaline helps you finish your paper, win at sports or meet challenges. It is short-term physiological tensing and added mental alertness that subsides when the challenge has been met, enabling you to relax and carry on with normal activities.

If you cannot return to a relaxed state, this stress becomes negative. Changes in your body (increased heart rate, higher blood pressure, and stomach and muscle tension) start to take their toll, often leading to mental and physical exhaustion and illness.

College life offers many potentially stressful situations: grades, money worries, anxiety about meeting new people and fitting in, getting a job, relationship problems, to name a few. However, in addition to creating potentially stressful situations, college gives you an opportunity to evaluate and change the way you manage stress. Learning new ways to manage your stress, both short-term and long-term, is important.

Short-term ways to handle stress:

  • Relax where you are. Close your eyes and visualize yourself in a pleasant setting.
  • Take a break. Get some exercise or fresh air. Go someplace private, yell, or cry.
  • List all the things you need to do right away. Then prioritize the list and do only the top few. The rest can be your first priority tomorrow.

 

Long-term ways to handle stress:

  • Seek your own positive stress level. Strive for excellence within your own limits.
  • Choose your own goals. Do not live out the choices others have made for you.
  • Be realistic in your expectations. Do not expect perfection from yourself or others. Accept what you cannot change. Do not spin your wheels over what cannot be changed.

If you are experiencing a tremendous amount of stress, visit the Mountain View College Counselor in the Student Services Building S2076 or call 214-860-3640.